Tuesday, August 21, 2012

This is the Ballad of Loathsome Larry

This is the Ballad of Loathsome Larry,

Oh that man, he was so contrary,
book cover
whether as man, or beast,

he could quite defend, a position

of cowardice indifferent to offend.

On a night out, blind-dated you see

he got not what he wanted, so sat

in a tree. Not any tree this, 'twas lit

by three: red, yellow and green and
and at a count 'til one, two, thr--

at which he bolted his date on a

cold winter's eve, she watching
gape-mouthed as he hastened
to flee. This tale of a fool is told
every year, so that both large ones
and small may point and jeer. For
Larry was heard to say, as he sped
out of sight: 'You pick up the tab,
I'm calling it a night!'



reading group

Larry was also a known enthusiast -- enthusiastically pursuing his Ballad too long in the pointless, the rough of composition, and to short in actual meaning. The devotion to silliness, to irrelevance---to the illogical, which too many would-be children's authors find themselves, whether by plan or by accident, tramping through is an ever-danger of the genre. And...why? Because they're kids..?


I like to say, once your story has turned into a rather non-directional romp through fantasyland where you are throwing in characters, creatures, thangs & names, you've gone off to see the wizard and there aren't many recovery programs there in Oz.

It would do a body good, and a plot better, to remember that children are NOT stupid. Lacking in life experience: obviously. But easily capable of determining when the story they are reading is wandering  well off-path, off-topic and into the realm where they may more devotedly be patronized to---because the creator of the story, that world, ran out of ideas or had no sustainable plot from the outset.

Do not let this happen to you! Don't be Loathsome Larry: a person who will book an outing or event and bolt without explanation or warning at the first stoplight---particularly if you're not in the car with him. Following, always a bad position to be in off the pole. If nothing else presents itself, then dash the project itself and start over with something newer, fresher. You got into this, now get yourself out.

As an dded example, I will highlight just as a sample some writing Larry had done [it's listed here on Booksie]; and I can include even more, if you like. From drafts & whatnot it will become evident what going 'off to see the Wizard' looks like.

Frank L. Baum got away with this (as well as some horribly published 1st editions of his first book). This doesn't imply that you can. Indeed, without a solid basis, everyone who comes after can well expect they will not be able to pull off the same stunt. And why should you? There simply isn't enough space on shelves for too much brainlessness.


[Codicil: Larry, it turns out, was none other than Marvin Balman, tho he denies it, a man of ill-repute & an ex-con...or maybe a still-con--not quite sure whether he's served all his time. In anys, he has long been an existential nemesis to u-no-who, and consequently one of my heroes]

Saturday, June 9, 2012

Harry Sharpe, Det. ... but in Narnia?

 >*Continuing in my efforts of importing old blog posts, I offer here a reprint of one from an account I have/had. Unfortunately, due to interference from the folks who run that operation, I was forced to abandon it, but not before reclaiming, w/ considerable difficulty, all (most?) of my property. Yet, when I did, there was one little mix-up that left me fuming and poor Gilded Age Det. Sharpe lost in.... Well, One thing at a time, & One piece of which, being the following:


June 4, 2012 at 6:43 am (Editor)(annotating, Harry Sharpe, NewYork Detective) · Edit
So, a bit of a hobby/project of mine is the editing and annotating of some old-timey detective fiction, circa late 19th century. Fun stuff, to be sure, I’ll post here just a snippet from the beginning
of this tale about the exploits of one Harry Sharpe, The New York Detective. Can’t yet decide which format I prefer, so I’ll give both. Boy, times have changed:

Harry Sharpe

The New York Detective

By Harry Rockwood

Edited & Annotated By Lamont Baskerville

Chapter I

A Blow In The Face

'Ben Collester had been in the district messenger service(1) just one year to a day when something happened that sent his usually steady wits flying in all directions.
1. Boys or men employed by courier services to deliver mail, telegraph, news or other items of import, usually by bicycle, in urban areas. Early bicycle development and advancement popularized this means of transport and communication in Europe. Begun in the 1860′s following the Civil War in America, it really came into its own by
the 1890′s, and continues to this writing.
The discharge of his routine business brought him to the door of an imposing mansion near Fifth Avenue, in the great city of New York.
He rang the bell briskly, then waited, then rang again, pulling up his coat collar to cut off the sharp wind that was blowing, with the small particles of sleet and snow which had begun to fall.
Two rings at the bell and no answer. Such a house always has a footman or some one whose duty it is to answer the bell upon all occasions(2), and they must be very green indeed if they do not recognize the imperative summons of the postman or telegraph boy.
(2) *sigh* Then, as now, good help is so hard to come by.'

OK, there’s that, then this:

Harry Sharpe

The New York Detective

By Harry Rockwood

Edited & Annotated By Lamont Baskerville

Chapter I

A Blow In The Face

'Ben Collester had been in the district messenger service(1) just one year to a day when something happened that sent his usually steady wits flying in all directions.
The discharge of his routine business brought him to the door of an imposing mansion near Fifth Avenue, in the great city of New York.
He rang the bell briskly, then waited, then rang again, pulling up his coat collar to cut off the sharp wind that was blowing, with the small particles of sleet and snow which had begun to fall.
Two rings at the bell and no answer. Such a house always has a footman or some one whose duty it is to answer the bell upon all occasions(2), and they must be very green indeed if they do not recognize the imperative summons of the postman or telegraph boy.

1. Boys or men employed by courier services to deliver mail, telegraph, news or other items of import, usually by bicycle, in urban areas. Early bicycle development and advancement popularized this means of transport and communication in Europe. Begun in the 1860′s following the Civil War in America, it really came into its own by the 1890′s, and continues to this writing.

(2) *sigh* Then, as now, good help is so hard to come by.'

I prefer side by side annotations, but with my current document I’m using it doesn’t seem to support that. I can always reformat later…


...And, as I intimated, the Above, was glossed and glued onto, the Below-- and oh-ho, what a screw-up! {And who's the Prince-- Unless it's good old Harry??}
  
Narnia: Gamin' w/ tha Prince















Sunday, April 8, 2012

Evil Bunny & Me

Harvey movie poster w/ Jimmy Stewart





Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

(Anonymous) (76.252.21.182)
Oct. 3rd, 2012 01:53 am (UTC)
San Patty Day
Curl, I just gotta let you know I had a similar experience, but w/ a leprechan. lol

Bests,

Arturo Pimm (http://arturopimm.xanga.com/)



Curler B. McG. (72.200.79.103)
Nov. 1st, 2012 02:53 am (UTC)
Re: San Patty Day
Too Funny, Art!


Sunday, January 1, 2012

Green Daze in 'Infinite' Tennis time

Tennis and Politics made green through Fair Vote filter

Do/U/Recall/The/1st/Campaign/?/...'08
Tennis any longer made me think,
does it all come of this:

A
line,
descent,
it ends
subsequently...

My goodness-- & an Infinite Jest reference as well!
[Update: 12/11/15]


For one, you can go skiing there.
GQ.COM
Comments

LikeShow more reactions
ReplyRemove Preview18/15 at 12:00am

http://www.nytimes.com/.../readers-respond-infinite-jest...

Commenters illustrate the starkly divided reception of David Foster Wallace’s ambitious novel.
NYTIMES.COM
Image may contain: text
26/16 at 4:10pm---Out of space, but not time____,
[2016 insertion] Fr: String Theory, David Foster Wallace (on tennis), "I’ve always hated tennis."


It is all ineffably tied up in the 90s...the cult-politics of that time,
like ghosts with bad, dark attitude from a Beetlejuice 80s;
and the time after 9/11....after the 2nd Arbusto burned 
away, yea even unto---no, not that f=r, but far eno-
-I'll get into Twin Peaks & it's progeny 
another time...